July 29, 2016

Teachers Sharing Resources

This is a hard post to write, but it comes from my heart. I am a mommy to a precious five year old named Blake. My husband is a lineman, so he works out of town. So most of the time, it's just me and Blake. As a teacher, my income is minimal. My husband has a good income, but he has to use a lot of it to pay for housing while he is on the road. In order to keep our home and have food on the table, I had to pick up extra jobs. Right now, I spend most of my time creating resources for Teachers Pay Teachers. I also do photography on the side. This summer, I've had multiple yard sales to help pay bills. I'm not asking for sympathy - I don't mind hard work to help my family, and the good Lord has blessed us with so much. But. . . do I feel guilty for taking time away from my son because I have to work? Yes, I do. Is it sad that he brings me my laptop at night and asks me if I have to work some more? Yes, it is. But that's just how it is right now. I'm working hard so that in the future, we can relax a little bit and not have to worry about money. So when you read my post, please don't get defensive, or think I am trying to single you out. I just feel the need to shed some light on the subject. Thank you for taking the time to read my thoughts.


We've all heard the saying - "Good teachers beg, borrow, and steal." I've said it a million times!! We all know that teachers are grossly underpaid, so we have to share ideas, borrow materials, and work together. I send out e-mails all the time asking to borrow a book, or manipulatives, or this, or that - all sorts of things. And I'm happy to share my resources when people ask for them. That's what good teachers do.

HOWEVER, the last part of that saying - stealing - that is where I have to disagree with this statement.

Let's talk about that - stealing. The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines stealing in three ways:
  1. to take (something that does not belong to you) in a way that is wrong or illegal
  2. to take (something that you are not supposed to have) without asking for permission
  3. to wrongly take and use (another person's ideas, words, etc.) 
Merriam-Webster. Merriam-Webster, n.d. Web. 29 July 2016.

As a teacher, I have collected some great resources. Lately, most of my resources are digital. So when a colleague comes in and says, "Hey, Monica! That looks great! Can you send that to me?" What am I supposed to do? I paid for that resource and it's mine to share with whomever I choose, right? WRONG! When I purchased these products, they came with a Terms of Use that says I have purchased one license to use for my classroom. That means that if I share it, I am violating the Terms of Use and breaking the law. To put it bluntly - I am stealing.

Stealing Is:
  • copying a digital resource (on paper) and giving it to someone
  • e-mailing a copy of a digital resource to someone
  • putting a digital resource into Google drive and sharing the link with someone
  • putting a digital resource onto a local server so that others can access it
  • putting a digital resource onto a hard drive or jump drive and giving it to others
  • creating a shared folder in your Google drive and sharing it with your teammates/colleagues
  • posting a resource online (whether free or paid)
  • posting a resource on your school web site
But no one gets hurt, right?

Wrong. 
  1. We are teachers. We are supposed to practice and model ethical behavior. We are hurting our students (and our colleagues) if we model inappropriate behavior.
  2. I am a seller on Teachers Pay Teachers. I use the money I earn in my store to help support my family. If we share resources, instead of others buying them, we are potentially taking money from other sellers' stores, hurting their families financially. If you aren't a seller, you may not know the time (and money) that go into creating products. Sellers take hours (sometimes days and weeks) creating a product, plus they have to pay for digital papers, clip art, and borders that go into the product.
  3. I cannot create my products without the amazing talent of the artists that I purchase from. Those artists work hard to provide clip art, papers, and borders. It isn't fair (or legal) to share their work.
So what can I do?

If someone asks you for a resource, you can still help them without breaking any Terms of Use violations. Not only this, but you are also supporting other teachers and their families.
  1. Send them a link to the resource - this way, your colleague can have and use the same thing you are using. You will both have a license, making it legal, and helping to support another teacher's family.
  2. Offer to purchase an extra license for them - on Teachers Pay Teachers, you have the option to purchase an additional license of a product - or more than one! Usually, the extra license is half of the price of the original. Your colleague can give you the money. Then you can purchase the extra license and send the product to them.
  3. If you've given away things in the past, you can make it right. Go back to your purchases on Teachers Pay Teachers. If you've given away a few copies of something, go and purchase a couple of extra licenses.
  4. If you have a shared Google drive folder, stop sharing immediately. Go into the folder, and click "share." If you have shared it with someone, their name will show up. Simply click the "x" beside his/her name and they will no longer have access to your files.
  5. If you have posted any resources online, free or paid, take them down.
I'm going to be honest. This is a touchy subject. It's easy to say "ok" when someone asks you to share, but it's much harder to say, "I'm sorry, I can't." If this is you, just be honest with your co-workers. Explain to them that it's illegal to share resources, but tell them you will be happy to send a link so they can purchase the product, or offer to buy them a license at a reduced cost. By abiding to a seller's Terms of Use, you are modeling ethical behavior and helping other teachers and their families.

A Special Note to my Customers
To each of you that have purchased something from my store, my family and I want to thank you. Lately, I have had several customers to purchase additional licenses. I want to thank you for your honesty.


June 28, 2016

Ten Ways to be an Amazing Teacher... From a Parent's Point of View


My son is getting ready to start kindergarten. Yes - I blinked and it happened! It's summer, so I've had time to reflect on his days in preschool. I've been able to see education from a parent's point of view, which has helped me become a better teacher. Here are some things I've learned.


  1. Treat everyone fairly. Blake was blessed with amazing preschool teachers. Every teacher and assistant that he has worked with has treated everyone fairly. If Blake did something amazing, he was rewarded. If Blake broke a rule, he was punished. Everyone was treated the same.
  2. Communicate. As a teacher, I didn't always communicate well with parents. Yes, I responded to e-mails, phone calls and notes, but I didn't really go any further than that. Through Blake, I've learned that communication is more than that. It's important to keep parents in the know. For example, if Blake had a rough day, I would get a phone call or a note. If there were skills he was struggling with, his teachers would let me know and provide resources for me to help him. His teachers would send notes about upcoming events, and then send reminders, too! As teachers, we can (and should) step up the level of communication. You can't be in contact with every family every day. However, I do feel that we need to reach out to and include parents as much as possible.
  3. Send work home. I'm sure most of us do this already, but I did want to include this because I think it is so important. In my classroom, I *try* to send work home on a weekly basis. I send it inside a manila folder with a sheet of paper inside. The paper has room for a parent signature, as well as a place to make any comments if needed. I love it when I pick up Blake and there is work in his cubby. It shows me what he has worked on during the day, plus it allows me to see his progress. A friend of mine has a son in high school and his teacher never sends work home. All she sees are his report card grades. She doesn't know what he is working on, doing well in, or struggling with, which is very frustrating to her. 
  4. Celebrate your students. Celebrate your students - anything and everything! It doesn't take long to call home and let a parent know that her daughter has finally mastered her multiplication tables. Or send a quick e-mail to let a parent know that her son has made a new friend at recess. In preschool, they make a big deal about birthdays. I wasn't able to leave school to be with my son for his school party, but his teacher took pictures and sent them to me. 
        
  5. Incorporate students' interests in your classroom. I had a few students who didn't really like school last year. They were great students, but it took a little more on my part to keep them interested. One student liked dinosaurs, so I made sure to incorporate some hands-on activities that I knew he would like during our fossils unit. Another student was a huge Beetles fan. So during morning work, I would make sure a Beetles song was on my playlist. These are little things, but they mean the world to students. It shows them that you care. After the last Minions movie came out, Blake was into Minion everything! So his teacher bought a Minions Jello kit and let the students make it in the classroom, complete with Minion glasses! 
  6. Take time to do arts & crafts. I am no artist, and any student that has ever had me will tell you that! However, you can still do art projects with your students. Give students the opportunity to show you what they learned through a drawing, a sculpture, or another format. Then send this work home. I remember several years ago, before I had my son, doing a Christmas craft at school. I didn't want to give up my class time to do it. Face it - it's hard work on teachers! However, my colleague did have a daughter. I remember her telling me how precious those crafts were to her as a mother. Now that I have a son, I totally see what she meant. So now, even though we are pushed for time, I always take a little time for art and crafts. 
  7. Love them. We don't always know what our students are going through. Maybe they have had a terrible morning at home and are looking forward to school. Or maybe their pet died last night and they didn't want to come to school. Whatever the case, love your students.
  8. Let them play. I have seen, more than ever, how important play is to children. I love that Blake's teachers give them so much time to play. They know how important it is to a child's development. I read a study from Texas where students were having recess more times during the day. The result was increased test scores. Maybe you can't have recess very often, but you can incorporate brain breaks into your routine. I love Go Noodle! We take breaks in between lessons, which helps students get refocused and recharged. It's vital to children't development to let them play!
  9. Let students have a voice. This year I asked my students to grade me. In the past, I've given a paper copy of a "report card" for them to complete. This year, I went Google! I sent students a link to a Google form and asked them to "grade" me. They loved that they were given a chance to be heard. I loved their responses!! They said they loved math, but added, "Please don't teach out of the book every day." 
  10. Be real with your students. This tip just makes life real. Sometimes you won't know the answers, and that's ok! Tell students that! Sometimes you mess up and it's ok! Students need to see that we aren't perfect. They need to learn skills to help them through situations where they may not know the answers.
I hope I've given you some ideas on for your classroom. If you have any additional tips, I would love to hear them! Comment below if you're willing to share!

June 12, 2016

Pros and Cons of Team Teaching

Last year was my first attempt at team-teaching. I teamed with a colleague. I taught all of the math, science, and social studies. She taught all of the language arts and health. It was an eye-opening year.

Positives
  1. Students - I had the opportunity to have 45 students (not at one time) instead of 22. We switched, so one class had 23 and the other had 22. I got to meet and work with more students, which is always a positive!
  2. Fewer subjects - I go to teach math (my favorite), science and social studies. Because I had fewer subjects to plan for, I had more time to prepare my lessons.
  3. A great teammate - My colleague is awesome! It was very nice to have her support, encouragement & feedback!
  4. Parent conferences - We did conferences together, which was awesome. Yes, it was twice the number of conferences that I would have normally had, but with two of us, we were able to give parents more specifics about their child. 

Challenges
  1. Parent communication - I had an AWESOME group of parents this year. However, it was challenging to communicate effectively with all of them. 
  2. Absences - I have student folders to keep up with students' missing work. If a student is absent, I (or my students) put a folder on his/her desk and fill it with missed assignments for the day. However, when there are two different classes, this can get overwhelming.
  3. Sharing desks - This was a NIGHTMARE!!!!! Every... Single... Day someone was complaining that his/her stuff was moved, messed with, or missing. I get it - I would complain too if my things were gone. However, with crunched schedules and a heavy curriculum, it took up SO much time trying to track down missing items.
  4. Schedule changes - If we had an assembly, or a fire drill, or anything out of the ordinary, our schedules would have to be switched around. This was ok, and we always worked through it, but I am SUCH a planner that it was hard for me to have to change my plan during the day. 
  5. The master schedule - Our schedule wasn't good this year. I taught my first block for an hour and a half. Perfect! Then, I only got my second block for 45 minutes. Then we had specials and lunch. Then I taught the second half of my second block. Then we had recess. Then I taught my second block again, then finished the day with my first block. Confused? So was I! Each block of students had the exact amount of time, but the day was so chopped up that I felt a little chaotic some most days.

Do you team teach or co-teach? I'm looking for the best ideas out there to help shorten my list of challenges and lengthen my list of positives. I would love to hear from you!! Check back soon for a blog post about ways to make this teaching style more productive!

June 11, 2016

New Blog Name!

My name is Monica Parsons. Welcome to my new blog!! You may know me by my former blog name - NC Teacher Chick. I decided to change my blog name for a couple of reasons.

  1. My Teachers Pay Teachers store name is Monica Parsons. I don't know if you are like me, but I always have a million thoughts running through my head. I need simplification. Therefore, all of my social media sites are now streamlined.
  2. I have never called myself "chick" or thought of myself as a "chick!" The only reason that my blog was ever NC Teacher "Chick" was because of my first blog design. When I was first learning how to blog, I found a free design site. A cute one that caught my eye had "chicks" on it. I loved the design, so I named the blog after it. 
So that's the story behind my blog name change. I'm excited to be here, on my new site.